Career search
When you are approaching the end of your college years, you begin to think very hard about what your entry level career will be. Your career is not likely to find you without some effort on your part, but what can you do to identify a good starting point?

Look for Opportunities to Meet With Potential Employers

Many companies and organizations now come to campus to meet with students who might be a good fit for them after graduation. You should find out what employers will be coming and meet with those that might have a job that will fit your qualifications.

Not every job will turn into a career, so you might want to focus specifically on the career aspects of the employers visiting campus. When you meet with companies and organizations, you can ask specifically about career opportunities and ways to advance from an entry-level position.

Your college's career center should have a schedule of employers that will be coming to campus to recruit. They may also sponsor trips to visit the companies or attend career fairs off campus, in which you can participate.

Career search
Take Advantage of Informational Interviews

Some companies will do informational interviews to help students (or professionals not in school) learn more about their workplace and corporate or organizational environment and culture. Although these interviews are not for the purpose of filling a job opening necessarily, they are a great source of information and some companies may use them to look for talent they can recruit in the future.

If nothing else, the interviews can give you an idea which companies and organizations might be a good cultural fit for you or have jobs for which you fit the qualifications. Following up with companies that fit your interests may be a good way to forge a relationship that may eventually lead to a career with them.

Choose Internships Carefully

Most 4-year programs now encourage students to do at least one internship. Choosing your internship(s) carefully may lead to a career, or at least show you what you don't want to do. Many employers hire students who do internships with them, if those students make a good impression while in the internship.

Employers look to recruit from internship participants, since they already have some idea about cultural fit and work habits by the time the internship ends. It should go without saying that you need to put your best foot forward while interning, then follow up to see if the company has any positions you could do or could at least give you a good recommendation for other positions to which you apply.

Your GDH Future is a site that showcases opportunities to work for GDH Consulting as a recruiter. Recruiters use their skills to source and recruit talent needed for various careers, as well as evaluate and improve the hiring processes of companies so they can hire faster, hire better quality employees, and retain those employees longer.

Finding the Right Entry Level Career Before Graduation
JAN 20 , 2017
Career search
When you are approaching the end of your college years, you begin to think very hard about what your entry level career will be. Your career is not likely to find you without some effort on your part, but what can you do to identify a good starting point?

Look for Opportunities to Meet With Potential Employers

Many companies and organizations now come to campus to meet with students who might be a good fit for them after graduation. You should find out what employers will be coming and meet with those that might have a job that will fit your qualifications.

Not every job will turn into a career, so you might want to focus specifically on the career aspects of the employers visiting campus. When you meet with companies and organizations, you can ask specifically about career opportunities and ways to advance from an entry-level position.

Your college's career center should have a schedule of employers that will be coming to campus to recruit. They may also sponsor trips to visit the companies or attend career fairs off campus, in which you can participate.

Career search
Take Advantage of Informational Interviews

Some companies will do informational interviews to help students (or professionals not in school) learn more about their workplace and corporate or organizational environment and culture. Although these interviews are not for the purpose of filling a job opening necessarily, they are a great source of information and some companies may use them to look for talent they can recruit in the future.

If nothing else, the interviews can give you an idea which companies and organizations might be a good cultural fit for you or have jobs for which you fit the qualifications. Following up with companies that fit your interests may be a good way to forge a relationship that may eventually lead to a career with them.

Choose Internships Carefully

Most 4-year programs now encourage students to do at least one internship. Choosing your internship(s) carefully may lead to a career, or at least show you what you don't want to do. Many employers hire students who do internships with them, if those students make a good impression while in the internship.

Employers look to recruit from internship participants, since they already have some idea about cultural fit and work habits by the time the internship ends. It should go without saying that you need to put your best foot forward while interning, then follow up to see if the company has any positions you could do or could at least give you a good recommendation for other positions to which you apply.

Your GDH Future is a site that showcases opportunities to work for GDH Consulting as a recruiter. Recruiters use their skills to source and recruit talent needed for various careers, as well as evaluate and improve the hiring processes of companies so they can hire faster, hire better quality employees, and retain those employees longer.